Mobility policies, or being able to work outside of the office, are becoming more common as we embrace and become more comfortable with internet-based technology. With a mobility policy, you can work anywhere as long as you have two things: a laptop and internet access. I’ve been with a firm for a little over a year that strongly embraces mobility, and I have certainly taken advantage of the policy—either working from home or at Starbucks when I’m not expected to be in the office or at a client site.

At a recent college career fair, people loved hearing about the luxury of working from home; however, their questions revealed their skepticism. Below I’ve included the most common questions I’ve received about work mobility:

  1. How are you held accountable?

This is almost always the first question out of the gate. Accountability is a valid concern when you have the ability to work somewhere with no direct supervision. However, people tend to miss the fact there is still supervision—even though it might not equate to someone physically looking over your shoulder. If you’re working from a laptop distributed by your employer, then most likely there are tools in place to monitor your online activity. No matter where I’m working, my coworkers can see when I’m online. When I step away, my computer automatically times out after fifteen minutes to show that I’m inactive.

Communication is important no matter where you work, but it’s extremely important when you’re away from the office. Always check in with your coworkers to let them know how you’re progressing and if you have any questions. This makes your work more transparent and ensures your team that you’re working—just be sure to be honest!

  1. How do you stay focused?

Staying focused is the most difficult aspect of working mobile, but the solution varies from person to person. I need to have a designated office space to work efficiently. An office with a desk, a comfortable chair, and very minimal distractions is the best work environment for me. I am not fond of working in bustling coffee shops or restaurants because I think they’re too distracting. If I do find myself getting distracted no matter where I’m working, headphones and some music always helps.

  1. How do you determine when you work from the office?

More often than not, this will be an easy decision. If you need to access office equipment, check your mail, or work extensively with a coworker, then you should definitely work from the office. Some people prefer working in the office because they can’t focus at home, or they enjoy seeing other people. If you have a terrible commute, car problems, or you’re feeling under the weather, then working from home is a better option.

  1. Does a mobility policy help with work-life balance?

Yes and no. There are many ways working mobile can help with work-life balance. If you have a long commute and can work from home for part of the week, you can work at the times you would have been driving. Parents can work from home whenever they need to be there for a sick child. A parent can work at a coffee shop close to his toddler’s daycare for easier pick-up. However, for some people being able to work anywhere brings the feeling that you are obligated to work wherever you are. It is still important from a work-life balance perspective to have a clear understanding of your work expectations and your personal limits. If working from home makes it impossible to turn off the laptop and relax after working hours, then working from the office would be best.

There are many gains from a mobile working environment. However, the most important advice I give when working away from the office is to maintain a solid line of communication with your coworkers. While you may not be working in the office, you are still expected to perform, and perform well.

Does your employer have a mobility policy? What advice would you give on the matter? Please share in the comments below!

 

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